New Kid on the Block: Welcome, Broadly

Since their early inception, women’s magazines have dramatically evolved. Back in the day, publications like Family Circle or Woman’s Day peddled recipes, new products, and weigh loss regimes to stay at home moms. But over time, the magazine world woke up to the fact that, in addition to being a portal to the American family, women also have interests of their own. During the 90s resurgence of feminism, magazines like Jane, Bust, and Bitch burst onto the scene and shook up the Cosmopolitan status quo. While it’s unlikely that one publication can cater to everyone woman, the digital age ushered in more opportunities to reach a larger audience.

womens day

Image courtesy of Christian Montone

Back in February, I caught wind of Vice’s new feminist media channel, Broadly, and I admit I was intrigued. I have a hit or miss relationship with Vice. Some of their reporting, like their presence in Baltimore after the murder of Freddie Gray, feels critical; their team explores stories that other major news outlets won’t touch. On the flip side, I tend to roll my eyes at some of their fluffier content; how many headlines that begin “I Took a Lot of Drugs at…” does one media outlet really need?

Tracie Egan Morrissey

Photo courtesy of WWD

However, I’m optimistic about Broadly because it’s perfectly positioned to go in on the women’s issues that make mainstream media uncomfortable. Nobody on CNN is talking about rape, abortion, or even vaginas in the abstract. With editor in chief Tracie Egan Morrissey at the helm, Broadly’s team aims to balance hard-hitting journalism with arts and culture reporting. Based on the channel’s trailer, they’ve already generated a decent body of work. Take a look at what’s new at Broadly and follow them on social media for future updates.

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