Tagged: artist

Schoolin’ Life: Gisele Jobateh

In the final installment of Schoolin’ Life, we meet illustrator Gisele Jobateh.

Gisele Jobateh

In what ways did society shape your expectations of yourself?
Being a queer person of colour society left me feeling generally negative about myself. Add on to that a bunch of body image issues and it was a rough couple of decades for me. My skills were usually questioned or downplayed, as well as my intelligence. Thankfully, I did get to meet some people who helped me through these stigmas: high school teachers and the few long lasting friends that made sure I knew I was valued.

What was your first job like?
It was fast-paced and tiring. I worked as a camp assistant for local art summer camps for children. But this summer job did teach me patience, to an extent, as well as being around minds that engaged with things with complete earnestness and interest (if you could keep their attention on the task at hand, of course).

In what ways did your friendships change?
Over time, I stopped making friendships based on social survival and instead on actual common interests. The amount of abusive friends I had diminished greatly when I started to recognize my worth and dropped anyone who tried to diminish it in my eyes through “playful” bullying and name calling, especially of the racial kind.

What did you learn through your romantic relationships?
I learned that I don’t like cis men, and that I am decidedly gay. Also, that I would rather be alone than with someone who I didn’t like out of some sort of romantic necessity.

How did your relationships with your family change?
I’ve become a little more open to understanding them and recognizing that they have their own private lives. As I grew up, I saw them more as individuals who are learning and growing themselves, instead of as a unit that I was also a part of. I am still close to my family, but there’s also a comfortable distance between us.

How do you feel society viewed you?
Generally negatively, considering the demographics I am a part of. I feel you can gauge your place in society based on how grating you find advertisements, and I’m pretty much the mirror image of the kind of customers most corporations want to appeal to, especially since I no longer desire to change myself to fit that image.

How do you feel you changed emotionally?
I think I’ve become calmer. I still have bad days where I get anxious, but it’s no longer to the point that I’m incapacitated by it. I also like to think I’ve matured emotionally.

How did you change intellectually?
I’ve shifted away from book smarts and more towards people smarts. I’ve gotten better at interacting with people socially, sometimes even volunteering to meet new people and even do public speaking. In the past, I’d much rather be the person doing the behind the scenes work, mainly research, or nothing at all, just watching and learning.

In what ways do you feel your identity changed?
In many ways. I feel more self-confident, as much as the world around me tries to bring me down. I’ve gotten out of the habit of asking for permission to seek out my ambitions and happiness.

How did your worldview change over the course of the decade?
As much as my inner confidence has grown, my confidence with the outer world has diminished. I feel slightly more jaded than I did when I was in my late teens and early twenties. I still have some hope for the future, but it’s becoming more and more apparent to me that the people in power got their power by cheating, and they will keep it with more cheating. It’s frustrating to think about.

Who was your biggest influence and why?
There wasn’t just one influence on my life or my drive towards success. My mom is a big one, of course. I’ve known her all my life, and although we’ve had a couple of rough patches, I still see her as an inspiration.

My former Media Studies teacher from back in high school, who taught me the foundations of critical thinking, was also a big influence. Her classroom was always open and she let me hang out in it during lunch because I preferred quiet, secluded places to eat. She leant me a lot of books and even gave me a couple, believing in my intelligence. I would return most of them thoroughly read and we would have short book club meetings about them.

And then there was my high school English teacher, who was a black woman and helped me connect better with one half of my race. She taught me about the past and present civil rights movements, and although I didn’t understand the importance of these lessons at the time, looking back she gave me a very important foundation upon which I am now building myself up.

Do you have any regrets? Are there things you wish you’d done, hadn’t done, or done differently?
I often tweet about my regret of going to university at all and wasting all that money on tuition, considering that I’ve been developing a skill that can be self taught and is my main source of income. But even though I feel silly for sinking 30K and 5 years of my life into two degrees, I can’t fully regret it, considering it is what has made me the person I am today. I like what I had become.

Schoolin’ Life: Vanessa Uhlig

In today’s installment of Schoolin’ Life, we get to know filmmaker and graduate student Vanessa Uhlig.

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Give us a quick bio: who are you, what are you into, and how do you spend your days?

I’m a 30 year-old film production graduate student at University of Texas at Austin. It’s my first year of graduate school so I am still adjusting to an intensive program of writing, shooting, and editing my own work and that of my other classmates. I’ve been watching a lot of films in my free time and have been revisiting one of my favorite genres, heist/crime thrillers, and have recently started learning jiu jitsu. This is also the first time I’ve been living back in the US in about four years, and it feels great to be getting to know the great city of Austin for the first time while being able to relax back in my home culture.

When you were in your 20s…

What expectations did you have for yourself over the coming decade?

Adventure. Around the time I graduated from undergrad at 22, I could feel my legs needing to stretch and get moving. After my first day at my first job out of college – an office job at a Bay Area solar start-up – I came home and cried. I was afraid that this was where I’d end up in life and there weren’t any more adventures to be had. I made a conscious decision over the next year to do whatever was in my power to fight against that kind of lifestyle and explore as much as I possibly could in the world while I was young. And for the most part I was successful at that; I spent the rest of my 20s living in foreign environments, learning new skills and languages, and eventually finding my calling as an artist.

In what ways did society shape your expectations of yourself?

I come from a lower-middle class family. I was lucky to have the support of my parents creatively, but I always knew that out of college I needed to be able to support myself with a full-time job. My family didn’t necessarily disparage art, but they did remind me to have an income and look for ways to monetize whatever I was interested in pursuing.

What was your first job like?

I can’t remember which of these I held first, but when I was 15 and 16 I had a few jobs: serving coffee at Starbucks, working the insurance desk at an autobody repair shop, and working the retail counter at a local perfume shop. I also did a lot of babysitting. It was exciting to have a job and a paycheck as a young person, and even though the jobs pretty much sucked, I still felt beholden to them with a strong sense of responsibility. I had to wake up at 3 am to open Starbucks at 4 am most days that I worked there, and it was rough, but there was something magic about being the first person that some customers would talk to each day and about starting the day that early in the morning. I think I also gained more of an appreciation for school since being at work was so much less interesting.

What was your first apartment like?

I shared an apartment with a girlfriend after college in Oakland, California. We both had boyfriends and all four of us had gone to the same college so we were all friends. We cooked a lot and drank a lot of wine, and there was always music or NPR on in the background. Strangely, a neighbor gave us a huge flatscreen TV, and much to my roommate’s dismay, my boyfriend and I watched a lot of Lost. It was my first time living in a more urban neighborhood, which was exciting – I could walk a block to the coffee shop or grocery store, and people came by campaigning for various political issues. One night, a girl was canvassing and I invited her inside. We ended up talking for an hour at my dinner table, just because I was so excited to meet someone this way.

Did you experience any big life changes?

Of course. I moved around a lot in my 20s – every few years at least. I felt like I had to reinvent myself each time, just to adapt to the new situation – I went from a small town in the Sacramento Valley to Oakland, then to Bangkok, Thailand for a year, then San Francisco for a few years, and finally a few years in a rural town in Guatemala. Each place had its own unique flavor and drew out a different kind of inspiration in me. And each time I think I recognized that I don’t really change much in the end, for better or for worse – wherever you go, there you are. By the time I hit 30, I could finally embrace that, which gave me the freedom to move back to the US for good and create the kind of life I want right here at home.

In what ways did your friendships change?

I think the general trend is/was from friendships that deal a lot with personal vulnerabilities to friendships that are grounded in love and respect. I’m fortunate to have maintained strong friendships over the past ten years. Even though we’re all busy and all living in different places, I consider these friendships one of the greatest gifts and accomplishments of my adult life. I try to stick to gratitude and respect to guide me in friendships rather than getting caught up in little daily annoyances or gripes. The little stuff goes away, and at the end of the day I’m still amazed and honored to have such great friends.

What did you learn through your romantic relationships?

Let it go! Relationships are WEIRD and how they manage to stay alive can sometimes be an amazing mystery. It takes so much love and trust to be with someone else – give them the benefit of the doubt and move on. I have learned this, but I still make this mistake and have to relearn it about once a week.

How did your relationships with your family change?

My relationship with my mother evolved to be completely different in my 20s than it had when I was younger. I don’t feel like we have ever had as strong a relationship as we do now that I’m older. I think she and I are very similar and used to butt heads a lot, but now that we’re both older and have fewer opportunities to be in each other’s daily lives, we tend to let the smaller stuff go. We can laugh about each other’s neuroses more.

How did your worldview change over the course of the decade?

It’s definitely had ups and downs as I’ve moved between areas of very extreme wealth and very extreme poverty, “progressive” versus “traditional” cultures, etc. I think at this point I have an appreciation for the many different cultural textures that I’ve been exposed to, but I feel also more urgency to equalize the playing field. There used to be a novelty for me in the “developing world” – things like real people collecting your bus fare or making homemade ice cream on a three-wheeled cart in the afternoons on the city street, to sell for ten cents. More direct, pedestrian-oriented lifestyles. I still see the charm in that but I see also the way that technology and globalization is causing unbearable economic disparity and making it hard for people to have enough to eat, which is so much more important than how picturesque a culture is on a postcard or in a few months’ travel journal entries. Unfortunately, it seems the more I learn the more I feel like an outsider in other cultures, or the more aware of those disparities I become.

Do you have any regrets? Are there things you wish you’d done, hadn’t done, or done differently?

I regret having ever doubted myself. I do it every day, as we all do, but it’s a waste. There really just isn’t enough time in life to wrestle with your own doubt. If you’re thinking about something, just do it. Don’t overthink it.

Dame of the Day: Thuraya Al-Baqsami

Thuraya Al-Baqsami

Today’s Dame of the Day is Thuraya Al-Baqsami (1952-). As a student, Al-Baqsami studied art in Egypt and obtained a master’s degree in Graphic Design in Russia before returning home to Kuwait. Her work is part of private and public collections worldwide and received praised from United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan; the UN commissioned her for a sculpture project that traveled around the world. She also received awards for her short story collection, Cellar Candles, and her children’s book, The Recollection of small Kuwaiti Fatuma.

Art Beat: New Work By Erin Morrissey

As you can tell from our masthead, us LC members go way back. With over ten years of friendship in the bank, we’ve watched as our work change and progress. Since she works in the arts, our girl Erin Morrissey generated a particularly amazing visual timeline over the past decade. For as long as we’ve known her, Erin has been drawing on a daily basis, experimenting with new techniques, and constantly pushing her work to the next level.

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Image courtesy of Erin Morrissey

We think Erin’s latest collection is particularly awesome because it’s such a departure from her usual style. While she’s a phenomenal artists capable of producing lifelike work, this new series is all about experimentation and abstraction. First, she creates a portrait sketch. Then, she painstakingly silkscreens the sketch onto a canvas, cleans up the lines, and creates a clean print. For those of you who haven’t silk screened before, the medium doesn’t necessarily lend itself to precise, clean lines. Creating a quality print requires patience, a good eye, and a steady hand.

Erin2

Image courtesy of Erin Morrissey

Once she pulls the print, Erin adds individual details by hand: a swatch of copper ink here, an additional flourish there. The final piece catches your eye, invite you to explore the details, and look great on any wall.

Erin 3

Image courtesy of Erin Morrissey

Want an Erin Morrissey original? You’re in luck; she’s just launched her own shop and regularly posts new pieces. Take a look, snag a print, and share the link with a friend. Way to go, girl!

Dame of the Day: Kenojuak Ashevak

Kenojuak Ashevak

Today’s Dame of the Day is Kenojuak Ashevak (October 3, 1927 – January 8, 2013). After Christian converts murdered her father, Ashevak and her family took over his hunting and fur trading business. While her relatives taught her traditional crafts, Ashevak became one of the first Inuit women to draw extensively. Her work appeared on Canadian stamps, coins, and even in the form of a stained glass window.

Dame of the Day: Sybil Lamb

Sybil Lamb

Today’s Dame of the Day is Sybil Lamb. In 2009, Lamb was traveling across the United States when, one night in New Orleans, two men beat her with a pipe. Lamb survived despite sustaining serious neurological damage. She channeled the episode into her new book, I’ve Got a Time Bomb. Today, she continues to paint portraits and murals and write books and zines about her experience as a trans woman navigating queer and straight culture.

Schoolin’ Life: Carolita Johnson

For today’s edition of Schoolin’ Life, we check in with illustrator Carolita Johnson.

carolita

When you were in your 20s…

What expectations did you have for yourself over the coming decade?

In my 20s, I had no idea what I was going to do with my life. I was modeling because it was a time when “ugly” models were a thing, and a few people had liked my odd looks, so that bought me some time and got me traveling internationally, even if it didn’t make me much money. But I was lonely and aimless and not good with people, so after a while I thought I’d do better to get back into studying.

In what ways did society shape your expectations of yourself?

Well, I lived in Paris, and was an ex-model, and not even a famous one, so people kind of didn’t think I was good for anything, which meant I felt like a big loser, especially once “ugly” models were a thing of the past and I had no more livelihood. It’s bad enough being an old model who no one wants anymore, but being an old model who didn’t even make money, and who wasn’t pretty enough or submissive enough to marry some rich businessman made me a real oddball. I was obviously not fit for marriage, and I had no real idea of my vocation till my mid-thirties. As an expat in Paris, the French regarded me as someone who’d someday leave, so I couldn’t place any roots down. But I did make a lot of expat friends who were in the same position as I was, and from the more successful (emotionally and creatively) ones, I learned to become my own center of gravity.

What was your first job like?

Ha. My VERY first one? When I was 13, I worked at the library after school a couple days a week, shelving books. It was great. I read a lot of books, kind of in alphabetical order. I also stole a lot of books. (Sorry!) If you mean my first REAL job, as an adult? That was awful. I worked for a photographer, as a studio manager in New York, got bossed around a lot, spent all my money on take out food and videos and Polaroid film (nasty habit), ended up 15K in debt, felt burned out, and swore that if I were gonna work full time, it’d have to be in Paris, where I’d get five weeks of paid vacation and national health insurance. It wasn’t that my boss wasn’t nice, it was just that full time work for someone other than myself in New York was a crappy experience.

What was your first apartment like?

After living in garrets for ten years in Paris, my first apartment felt like a castle. It was amazing. I had a bathtub and closets. I burned food because I was so used to being in such a small place that all I had to do was smell the food cooking to know when it was ready. But with the kitchen in another room, I’d forget I was cooking. I’d run around like a little kid from room to room (it was only a one bedroom but it felt so huge), instead of walking.

Did you experience any big life changes?

Yes, I did. In Paris, life was predictable and calm. In New York City, it was a different world almost every day, and you never knew what might happen. I also began doing cartoons and writing, which I realized I’d been waiting to do all my life.

In what ways did your friendships change?

When I quit talking to my mother, my friendships and all my relationships became much healthier. I’m not lucky in my mother, who is a bit of an underminer, for all she’s done that’s positive in my life. Once I cut her off, it was amazing how my relationships improved for the better. I’m a more positive person, no longer a worrier. Perhaps I should worry a bit more, but I’m careful to choose friends who aren’t shy, and who know how to fend for themselves, and who actually like me now.

What did you learn through your romantic relationships?

I learned that American men are way too sensitive and selfish for the most part. In France, I remained friends with old lovers and boyfriends, who even became friends with each other. They’d call me and say, “Hey, it’s your old lovers, we’re drinking to your health!” When I was between relationships, if I had to go home from a party, they’d consult with each other and decide who would walk me home safely. But in America, men would drop me off in a cab and not even wait to see I was in the door! Men wanted me to be the BEST GIRLFRIEND IN THE WORLD but wanted to be the worst boyfriend in the world. Plus, they’d want to have lots of girlfriends but they’d expect me to have only one. I thought they were very unreasonable. In France, I was treated like a queen. Here, in NYC, I was chopped liver. Interesting, isn’t it?

How did your relationships with your family change?

Like I said, I cut my mom off when I realized she was a bad influence on my work and my relationships/friendships. I had to take control of my life, and being in my late thirties and still afraid of my mother’s opinion of me was debilitating. My brothers are lovely men, and very supportive, and my dad, who is an Aspie (Asperger’s) is someone I’m just getting to know, now that he’s in his 80s. I’m only sorry I won’t have that many more years with him, but with a person like him, it’s more about the quality than the quantity of the time you spend with him. So, no regrets, really. I’m not going to be greedy. Some people never make up with their parents. I’m lucky.

How do you feel society viewed you?

Society I think viewed me as a bit of a glamorous woman, because of my modeling years, and my rather crazy stories. That’s fine, it gets me by, gives me a bit of leeway to be a strong-willed and outspoken woman. Sometimes it’s a little weird, when people think I’m going to be a sort of SATC kind of woman, which I’m not. I’m not a girly-girl at all. I’m very practical and humble in many ways. I just started working in a cafe upstate, where I feel really great wiping tables down and taking orders and being part of a healthy, positive and creative team. I’m not sure they know how old I am, but if they do, they don’t really care. They don’t know about my past, which is kind of great. At the most, they think I am kind of cool for being a cartoonist. So, the fact that I fit in with them makes me feel like my identity is more than my past, and I’m fascinated by who accepts me as I am. I try not to wonder too much how they see me and just “be.” It’s a great feeling, and it makes me feel like I can do so much more than I even suspect.

How do you feel you changed emotionally?

I was just saying to a colleague that I used to worry what people were thinking but now I just rely on my instincts. If someone has a problem with me, I figure they have the power of speech and can use it. Otherwise, I refuse to worry. If it’s worth being mad at me, it’s worth piping up, I say! Otherwise, forever hold your peace. I’m not an incendiary person, and I don’t deliberately set out to annoy anyone, so my conscience is mostly clear. I’m always ready to apologize or accept honest criticism. I don’t suffer fools.

How did you change intellectually?

In my second college education, I learned structural linguistics, which taught me how to think. I became very good at software and logic and language. This really reshaped my life and helped me become a really good researcher. For this, I’ll always be grateful. Before, when my education was only about art and the humanities, I was cultivated but lost. I think everyone should study the theory of groups and a little structural linguistics. The PAPY Modern Mathematic books for children are beautiful and they changed my life.

In what ways do you feel your identity changed?

My mom used to only call me Carolita when she was happy with me. The rest of the time I was “Carol.” One day, I just decided that I’d get everyone to call me “Carolita,” and that was that. I was happy all the time! I became a happier, more emotionally self-sufficient version of myself.

How did your worldview change over the course of the decade?

It has not. The world looks pretty much the same to me as when I was a kid.

What was the most embarrassing moment?

It’s pretty impossible to embarrass me. I can handle almost anything. I can’t really recall a thing.

What was your biggest disappointment and how did that affect you later?

My biggest disappointment was when I realized that my education in the public schools was really mediocre and that my first college education was also pretty mediocre. In both cases, of course, I had a couple of really good, inspiring teachers, but overall, it was very disappointing. When I was a kid, I thought college would be really rigorous and noble, but it just seemed like a marketplace. But in France, it was what I’d hoped for all my life. I was so grateful for my education in France, and when my fellow students cheated, I was appalled at their wastefulness. I took my studies there so much more seriously than they did. I really embraced my second chance to get an education, and valued every minute of it.

Who was your biggest influence and why?

Many people were huge influences, but perhaps the best influence, because he helped make me a happier person, was my friend, Juan, in Paris. By watching him and emulating him, I learned to navigate the world alone, talk to people, listen to them, hear things and see things that escape most people’s notice. He was a bit of a mentor without realizing it.

Is there any one experience that you feel defined the decade? Or one historical moment that changed you?

Ah, I now see that we’re still talking about my 20s but I’ve slipped in to my 30s as we went on. I hope that’s alright: I was a very late bloomer, and my early 20s were so depressed that I really needed to stretch into the early 30s to complete this decade of self-discovery. The one experience that defined that decade, however, was being an “ugly model” in Paris. You can’t beat that for a defining experience!

Do you have any regrets? Are there things you wish you’d done, hadn’t done, or done differently?

No regrets, ever. I think the only thing I wish I’d done differently was I’d have brushed my dog’s teeth more often and fed her moist dog food. Seriously. Take care of your dog’s teeth!

Is there a story that you feel best sums up the decade?

The story of when I was on the trolley in Milan, and a guy walked up to me and asked if I was with the “ugly people agency.” I’d been in a brief bubble of thinking I was an ugly duckling that had turned into a swan, and was on the verge of becoming rather full of myself. That snapped me out of it! Made me realize my identity was not going to be that of a beautiful model.

Dame of the Day: Corita Kent

Corita Kent

Today’s Dame of the Day is Corita Kent (November 20, 1918 – September 18, 1986). Kent joined the Roman Catholic order of Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary when she was 18, but she continued to take art classes and earn her bachelor’s degree. Even after she left the order in 1968, she continued to teach and make art. In 1985, her design was featured as the United Postal Service’s annual “Love” stamp. She also created the Rainbow Swash splayed across a gas tank in Dorchester, Massachusetts.

Dame of the Day: Shahzia Sikander

Shahzia SikanderToday’s Dame of the Day is Shahzia Sikander (1969-). Early in her art career, Sikander studied the tradition of Persian and Mughal miniature painting. Her incredibly complex, multi-faceted paintings addresses issues of economics, imperialism, colonialism and identity. Since her college days, Sikander has evolved her style to include digital animation and performance art. In 2006, Sikander became a MacArthur Fellow.

Schoolin’ Life: Vilma Metteri

In today’s Schoolin’ Life, we chat with the other half of Finnish artist duo Tärähtäneet Ämmät, Vilma Metteri.

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Give us a quick bio: who are you, what are you into, and how do you spend your days?

  • Vilma Metteri, 37 year old artist, living in Helsinki, Finland
  • Mother of a 12 year old son
  • Playful and kind spirit
  • Urge to observe and analyze the world around
  • Working every day with my best friend and colleague, Katriina

When you were in your 20s…

What expectations did you have for yourself over the coming decade?

When I was 20, I was studying to be an artist doing many transboundary art projects, and I expected to keep on painting at night and living my life as it came. I guess I didn’t make any long-term plans for the future; neither did I have many dreams. Life was happening to me, and I believed the best way to enjoy it was to react to possibilities that arose.

In what ways did society shape your expectations of yourself?

Looking people in the eye was something I learned at a young age. I found my way through social environments by being smart, easy-going and adaptable; I stood tall and was not afraid of facing challenges. It was always easy for me to see the reasons behind an individual’s behavior, to stay calm and not get irritated. That gave me a certain feeling of being in control in situations without having to do much. One might say it’s a form of laziness. After collaborating with Katriina, I learned the power of setting up goals and working to get there. I believe that you can get anywhere by stealing and combining the best parts from different socio-economical groups’ approaches and their inner norms and standards.

What was your first job like?

I always loved children and got paid for taking care of them. At the time, I was also drawing birthday cards for relatives.

Did you experience any big life changes?

I went through many longer phases in life with different energy levels, but also experienced more sudden life-changing happenings. Becoming a mother was one of the most influential moments. Sharing the responsibility of caring for sick loved ones totally changed the way I thought about life. I learned to appreciate the present moment, to always try to be kind, to show my love and to enjoy life now.

In what ways did your friendships change?

Being best friends with Katriina provides a state of mind where I feel total trust and support. It is a great feeling to know that someone sees you as you are, with your strengths and weaknesses, and still wants to share the world with you. Laughing and finding the bright side of life with a friend is the best there can be.

What did you learn through your romantic relationships?

I have learned to respect surrendering to love, being patient and vulnerable and not holding back. I have also learned to discover my own needs and wills and communicate them.

How did your relationships with your family change?

As the oldest child, I learned to take care of others and show my love through baking and cleaning.  I still like to pamper my family members, but I have learned that I can also be present by just doing nothing.

How do you feel you changed emotionally?

I try to be more honest with myself and teach that skill to my son. If I ever get angry, I celebrate that aloud!

How did you change intellectually?

My view of the world has been quite much the same for a long time, but reading and having conversations every day taught me to combine different levels of the world into a vivid fusion of understanding humanity.

How did your worldview change over the course of the decade?

I started to believe in dreaming! I also started to think more collectively.

What was the most embarrassing moment?

Can’t remember anything.

What was your biggest disappointment and how did that affect you later?

I am trying constantly to develop my weaknesses, and it seems I can’t totally beat them. I have learned to be more accepting of myself.

Who was your biggest influence and why?

I enjoy learning in every moment from my friends and colleagues. Specifically, I am learning better, more efficient ways of thinking and acting politically and understanding the world more clear and critical way. There is a massive need to interpret and influence what is happening around us!

Do you have any regrets? Are there things you wish you’d done, hadn’t done, or done differently?

I only wish I would have more concentration to be at my very best! I wish this for both my work and my personal life.

Is there a story that you feel best sums up the decade?

“Elämän paskalaari” / “The Trash Bin of Life” It means you will walk to the supermarket with a few coins in your pocket. Suddenly, life offers you surprises in the discount section: maybe some food just about to get old and you buy what is there. You can feel happy about the cheap price of the food, the feeling of surprise, and the idea of saving food from being dumped; you can view this whole action as part of the game in which we live.